New advocacy group focused on public health and marijuana policy - IASIC

New advocacy group formed - IASIC, the International Academy on the Science and Impact of Cannabis, are doctors who educate on marijuana. The science counters the misperception of the safety of marijuana by international experts who provide science, data, plus clinical expertise. This non-partisan and non-political group are developed, organized, and guided by doctors. MPI is proud to be partnering with them to get the word out about marijuana.

This group has developed an easy to use medical library for the public to understand the harms associated with use. The link below will take you the IASIC site and library.

 IASIC (iasic1.org)

Cannabis 2021: What Clinicians Need to Know

May is Mental Heath Awareness month an important time to have a discussion about marijuana use and mental health.

The acute and chronic problems cannabis-dependent individuals face are serious, disheartening, and deserving of treatment. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) data on 505,796 Americans2 show that between 2008 and 2016 individuals aged 12 to 17, who met criteria for a cannabis use disorder (CUD), were 25% more common in states that had enacted Recreational marijuana laws (RMLs) as opposed to those who did not. In addition, the THC content of the various preparations of cannabis has risen over the past 10 years.

Psychiatric Times article here.

Is COVID-19 Increasing the Rate of Accidental Drug Ingestion in Young Children?

The rates of young children accidentally ingesting illicit substances has been on the rise in recent years. This is in part due to increased opioid use and a broadening of states permitting legal cannabis. However, as the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent stay-at-home orders came into play, Natalie Laub, MD, a child abuse pediatrician at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego and an assistant clinical professor at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, noticed added stress on this troubling trend.

To read full article, click here.

UCSD Study: Docs Should Screen For Cannabis Use Disorder in Pregnant Women

Babies born to mothers diagnosed with cannabis use disorder are more likely to experience negative health outcomes than those without the disorder, according to findings published Thursday by UC San Diego researchers.

Researchers from UCSD's Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science examined nearly five million live births that occurred in California between the years 2001 and 2012, during which diagnoses of cannabis use disorder rose.

Click to view NBC news story.

San Diego Teens Have Higher Aspirations Than a Future in Cannabis

Ask us what we want to be when we grow up. We’ll tell you we imagine ourselves becoming doctors, teachers, firefighters, chefs, engineers, or attorneys. Some of us are born entrepreneurs. We dream of opening our own businesses or nonprofit organizations.Some of us are even more ambitious: We dream of becoming the President of the United States. None of the kids we know dream of becoming budtenders.

Full article at Times of San Diego.