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Vaping pot is more powerful than smoking it, study finds

Pot inhaled through a vape device produces a more powerful high — and often with more deleterious side effects — than the smoked version, a new study finds.

At the same level of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, vaping led to higher blood concentrations of the chemical than smoking, as well as higher levels of cognitive and psychomotor impairment and a higher incidence of adverse effects, such as vomiting, anxiety, hallucinations and feelings of paranoia, according to the report, published Friday in JAMA Network Open.

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Doctor: Beware of pot-infused Halloween candy

Can be hard to tell between packaging and look of products

By Gary Robbins

Food, candy and drinks infused with marijuana have become commonly available in California since January, when the first licensed pot stores began to open statewide.

The products are among the more popular items sold by the dispensaries. The consumption of edibles also is being popularized by cannabis cooking classes and free online tutorials.

That means there will be more edible cannabis in people’s homes when the public celebrates Halloween on Wednesday.

For complete Union Tribune article, click here.

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Marijuana Drug Interactions

A total of 610 drugs (4296 brand and generic names) are known to interact with marijuana.

  • 129 major drug interactions (910 brand and generic names)
  • 481 moderate drug interactions (3386 brand and generic names)

Click here for a complete list of drug interactions.

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Pot 'more harmful than alcohol' for teen brains

Teenagers using cannabis are causing long-lasting damage to their developing brains, a Canadian study suggests.

It found the impact on thinking skills, memory and behaviour was worse than that of teenage drinking. The researchers, from the University of Montreal, urged teenagers to delay their use of cannabis for as long as they felt able. The study tracked and tested 3,800 adolescents over four years, starting from around the age of 13. Drinking alcohol and taking drugs, such as cannabis, at a young age is known to cause problems with cognitive abilities such as learning, attention and decision-making as well as academic performance at school.

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